Ender's Game

, #1

Mass Market Paperback, 324 pages

English language

Published July 14, 1994 by TOR Books.

ISBN:
978-0-8125-5070-2
Copied ISBN!
OCLC Number:
1039119773
Goodreads:
375802

View on OpenLibrary

View on Inventaire

4 stars (41 reviews)

Ender's Game is a 1985 military science fiction novel by American author Orson Scott Card. Set at an unspecified date in Earth's future, the novel presents an imperiled humankind after two conflicts with the Formics, an insectoid alien species they dub the "buggers". In preparation for an anticipated third invasion, children, including the novel's protagonist, Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, are trained from a very young age by putting them through increasingly difficult games, including some in zero gravity, where Ender's tactical genius is revealed. The book originated as a short story of the same name, published in the August 1977 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact. The novel was published on January 15, 1985. Later, by elaborating on characters and plotlines depicted in the novel, Card was able to write additional books in the Ender's Game series. Card also released an updated version of Ender's Game in 1991, changing some …

8 editions

reviewed Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (Ender's Saga, #1)

Review of Ender's Game

4 stars

Compared to my previous two books, Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card, felt quite fast and quick, but that doesn’t mean the story doesn’t develop just as well as the books I read last year, not at all!

The state of the world is not a good one, Humanity hasn’t really conquered the stars and flourished just yet, other than a few stations. Earth has been at war with the buggers, some insectoid alien race that had come in contact with the planet twice already. The first time it was just exploration, and Humanity managed to hold out. The second time, was colonization, and we almost lost. Thankfully, the genius strategist Mazer Rackham managed to stop them and became the hero of the story. We lived happily ever after.

But decades have passed since then, and a third invasion is on the horizon.

Now, kids are being monitored from birth, …

reviewed Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (Ender's Saga, #1)

Review of "Ender's Game" on 'Goodreads'

1 star

didn't particularly like this tale of child soldiers/commanders - i could never let go of the ages of the main character, ender, and the incredible violence he unleashed. even though it is a movie now, i have no desire to see it.

i also thought it was morally ambiguous. ender doesn't want to harm but feels forced to, and ultimately kills a couple of children himself. the book never really adresses the loss of humanity when you snuff out a life. instead, ender see-saws between feeling so bad he goes straight to bed and won't eat, and justifying the need for such action. so the character lives on both plains of good and evil.
a book about violence and children should take a specific stand on the issue, and not be so wishy washy. then again, perhaps the author IS taking a stand but one that can't abide by: justified …

Review of "Ender's Game" on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

This is a novel I've heard mention of several times but never took the liberty to pick up. I'm pleased I did; I found it quite a thrill. Not in the intense way of some of the more modern science fiction, but there was a lot going on beneath the surface and it's evident that this work impacts on an individual level for many, many people.

reviewed Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (Ender's Saga, #1)

Review of "Ender's Game" on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

This is a gripping novel asking profound moral questions whilst travelling along at high velocity. It represents the absolute best SF has to offer and shows that the modern novel can be deep, thought provoking, imaginative and entertaining - as long as you don't waste too much time on the almost moribund genre of the "literary" novel.

Review of "Ender's game" on 'Storygraph'

1 star

This was one of those books that everyone was reading, when I was in high school. Based on the high volume of reviews, it seems like it still is. I read it, at the time, because of the glowing recommendations from a number of people whose opinions I valued.
For the life of me, I cannot understand why this book is so popular.

The characters are wooden in their portrayal, and some of the most implausibly written children I've ever read. The pacing is awful, rushing through sequences. It's as if Card's written a timeline checklist, and is trying to get through each point as quickly as possible. Which would explain why every instance of characterization is so damn heavy-handed.

Worst is the fact that Card's Mormonism is a driving factor to the plot. A different planet for each religion? Pro-militaristic dogma? Overt homophobia? Even when I was 15 and …

avatar for pwithnall

rated it

4 stars
avatar for ashi

rated it

5 stars
avatar for JesseLiberty

rated it

4 stars
avatar for nick

rated it

2 stars
avatar for salyavin

rated it

3 stars
avatar for chrisn

rated it

5 stars
avatar for zaratustra

rated it

5 stars
avatar for djryan

rated it

4 stars
avatar for gregoryg

rated it

3 stars
avatar for webframp

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Simon

rated it

5 stars
avatar for miroiucodrut

rated it

4 stars
avatar for DigitalRob

rated it

5 stars
avatar for malglam

rated it

5 stars
avatar for CTD

rated it

3 stars
avatar for Deebster

rated it

5 stars
avatar for JFitzMan

rated it

3 stars
avatar for jonpsp

rated it

2 stars
avatar for primeval_scribe

rated it

3 stars
avatar for kianryan

rated it

3 stars
avatar for vhallac

rated it

5 stars
avatar for joel@bookrastinating.com

rated it

4 stars
avatar for joeyclemens

rated it

5 stars